Somalia and Peacekeeping

Published on 11-01-11

The following article was submitted by a student of the Institute.  The article was not edited by staff personnel.  The opinions expressed in the article are of the student's only and should not be interpreted as an endorsement by the Institute.  Each student is encouraged to submit their own commentary to the Institute.

Somali people and never ending suffering is something way beyond my understanding. It seems to me the whole world has perhaps unintentionally overlooked the magnitude of Somali problems. Some people say it is internal conflict and Somalis should solve their own problems and not depend on the international community to solve it for them. Same could have been said about Afghanistan, Iraq, Kosovo, Bosnia, Congo, Liberia, Libya and the list goes on,  but the international world has chosen to intervene in these countries, why not Somalia? I wonder!

OK UN is there but not in the capacity required to restore peace. African union soldiers are under equipped and most of them are from countries not long ago suffered from same Somali circumstances, there were efforts to restore peace, install interim government and this and that but never a serious steps to once and for all resolve the never ending Somali problems, I like the notion of Somalis must resolve their problems however how on earth that could be possible? 20 years of lawlessness, famine and Al Shabab adding to that by killing anyone who talks about peace, weak government or none existing government, how on earth Somalis will ever be able to resolve these problems?

UN finally announced peacekeeping mission, based in Nairobi? How would you accomplish peace from outside? It is understandable the situation does not permit to establish a fully functioning mission within Somalia, but the situation will never permit itself, you have to make it permit, Send international forces, instead of African Union which by the way has only 2 countries Uganda and Burundi forces on the ground. It puzzles me how did the international community allowed a country to be lawless for over 20 years and Libya has well organized rebels who managed to overthrow a dictator in short period, yet the whole world is rushing to help and preparing and making statements that Libyan people need immediate help.

Peace can be accomplished in Somalia if a serious plan is drafted, strong forces from countries with well-trained soldiers and well-funded armed forced intervene and marginalize Al Shabab and only then peace can be achieved and life goes on for the longest suffering nation in this modern world.

Have you written a blog article? Consider having it published on our website.

Student Comments

Ethiopian forces currently deployed in Abiye and this gives me a national pride. As we all know, there are lots of war-torn countries in Africa and the world at large. Ethiopian peacekeepers and other African countries are doing harder to solve African problems by Africans. I feel really proud personally because I involve in laguage training for peacekeepers. It is really my pleasure to see my trainees effective in various missions across Africa.Many thanks

    ADDISU YILHAL wrote on 11-14-11 at 2:13 a.m.


Allow me to qoute Ban Ki mun's words, " there is no peacekeeping if there is no peace to keep" this tells the world that to do peacekeeping, first there should be peace other wise it would be harder. This particularly works in Somalia. the AU is using a technical term called 'forced entry' to save the life of many innocent Somalians from the attack of Al-Shebab

    ADDISU YILHAL wrote on 11-14-11 at 2:18 a.m.


The case of somali i think my fellow student who wrote this is very write when he talks about the UN not doing anything about the nation, because even now the kenya military are doing a very good job there to fight the insurgents and since they entered the war torn area,africa and the rest of the world have seen big improvement and the wonderful job the AU,somali transitional goverment and the KDF are doing and its our hope that now the AU have come to a solution of increasing the number of its force,the UN should intervene by supporting AU and even forming a joint AU-UN misson like the case for DARFUL.The international community should also support kenya in its efforts to bring peace in somali both financially,military equipments,trainings and humanitarian assistance to the people living in towns and villages captured by the kenya military.We love somali people and its our prayer for them to get peace a virtue that has been history in somali the last 20 years.God bless somali.

    philemon lemayian molo wrote on 11-28-11 at 4:13 a.m.


The right time to save somalia is now ,the AU forces currently in somalia are very few ,thanks to the kenya government for taking up the task to flush out alshabaab and open the hope that peace can be brought back to somalia , its therfore my hope that the international community to help and strengthen the AU mission and deploy more peacekeeping force on all the corridoors of somalia .

    hussein ali hassan wrote on 11-28-11 at 8:16 a.m.


I think it is mistaken in thinking that the pacification of a nation is only by force of arms! There is need for investment by way of grants from the United Nations for the construction of public infrastructure, including roads, railways, ports, warehouses, food, medicine, clothing, shoes, heavy investment in education of the Somali people, not in education social, but formal education, to do before the modern techniques of industrial production, modern farming techniques and agriculture, sustaining the market economy they are. We have to fight hard against the corruption, because it is anti-Islamic, unethical, usual patterns of the world. Peacekeeping Operations should be implemented, but as a measure of safety that will do the works of infrastructure and social adequacy of the country. Elvis Jesus Civil Guard Inspector, Brazil

    ELVIS DE JESUS wrote on 11-28-11 at 8:10 p.m.


While, I do agree that Somalia deserves the same chance, it is also true that sometimes “there is no peace to keep.” (A quote well stated by Addisu.) I was fortunate enough to study the UN peacekeeping mission that was deployed to Rwanda during my graduate studies and the end result of this mission was small in success. The genocide that took place in that country is beyond devastating. The UN deployed an under-equipped peacekeeping mission, which also resulted in the deaths of many peacekeepers. Eventually, the mission was pulled because peace could not be sustained. Accomplishing peace from the outside is a task that requires strength from all parties. The mission should have a clear mandate, sustainable finances and support from not just the UN, but from the host government. Somalia deserves its’ chance to have peace- but will the UN ever respond to that call?

    Rebecca Hamlin wrote on 12-05-11 at 6:34 p.m.


Congratulation for your efort of Writing this article

    Abdullahi Mohamud Adawe wrote on 04-02-12 at 7:23 a.m.


Somalia needs direct hands of the United Nations. Let the UN come in to Somalia in full swing and create a learning and understanding atmosphere that may lead to a successful action. Yes, African Union is there but it needs a direct upper hand of the United Nations.

    JUNJU DICKENS wrote on 04-02-12 at 6:47 p.m.


With an advantage of foresight, you can observe that the African Union Forces particularly those from Kenya have done very well in dealing with the Somalian issue. But like you rightly pointed out, Kenya is beginning to receive attacks in their own soil. I hope the Kenyan people, their security and intelligence agencies, and the government stand to deal with the outcomes. I also think the rest of the "UN world" abandoned Somalia after the US did, when some US troops were attacked and killed and their bodies dragged on the streets inside Somalia. But Africans have taken a bold step in spite of attacks in their countries.

    OKERE Samuel Chiedozie wrote on 10-27-12 at 1:38 a.m.


Hmmm! God is always in control. Best franci.

    Francis Owusu Takyi wrote on 12-29-13 at 4:30 p.m.


To leave a comment, you must be logged in and have a verified email address. Log in here.